([syndicated profile] chocolate_n_zucchini_feed Jul. 25th, 2017 08:00 am)

Posted by clotilde

Buy Clotilde's latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

These days our produce guy is all about tomatoes — big and small, ribbed, smooth, or pointy, red, yellow, green, or pearl — and at the rate I’m going, I am bound to turn into one very soon. I’ve been making tomato salads and sandwiches like they’re going out of style, I’ve been making tomato tarts and tomato tarragon bread soup, and I’ve been mixing batches of gazpacho.

(My two stand-by tomato tarts are the tomato tart tatin and the tomato mustard tart respectively featured in my first and second cookbooks. Get yourself a copy of Chocolate & Zucchini and of The French Market Cookbook today!)

Another one of my top uses for this tomato bounty is shakshuka, a preparation that can be found in slightly different incarnations across North Africa and the Middle East. My first encounter with it was in Janna Gur’s excellent Book of New Israeli Food, which I told you about here and here, and I have since become acquainted with the Tunisian version as well.

A not-so-distant cousin of Provence’s ratatouille, Corsica’s pebronata, and the Basque piperade, shakshuka is most commonly a dish of tomatoes stewed with onions, bell peppers, and chili peppers. This forms a thickish sauce, in which eggs are cooked — either scrambled or (my preference) undisturbed so they’re halfway between poached and sunny side up.

It is a simple, family-style dish that is quickly assembled, and highly flexible.

You can:
– add other vegetables, especially zucchini or eggplant that you’ll cook in the sauce; artichoke hearts, drained from a jar; and diced potatoes, which you should boil beforehand,
– substitute quality canned tuna or merguez (spicy beef sausages) for the eggs,
– garnish the dish with black olives and parsley or cilantro, as I like to do, or serve it plain,
– serve the sauce with lamb skewers or other grilled meats (just not pork, for cultural consistency),
– freeze the sauce for later use: think how thrilling it will be to eat shakshuka in November!

Some recipes call for roasting the bell peppers first, which is good if you find them hard to digest, but I don’t think anyone wants to fire up the oven more than strictly necessary when it’s hot out. Others suggest you peel the tomatoes, but it seems unnecessarily fussy to me.

If your spice rack boasts a Moroccan spice mix, such as ras el hanout, now would be a good time to use it, in place of the separate spices (cumin, caraway, paprika, turmeric, and cinnamon) I’ve included. And if you don’t have a mix, and you don’t have all the spices listed either, don’t worry about it too much and just use what you have.

About the cinnamon I use

I am in love with the fresh cinnamon I order from Cinnamon Hill, a small company that specializes in sourcing and selling the highest-quality, freshest cinnamon from Sri Lanka and Vietnam (ordinary cinnamon usually comes from China or Indonesia). I get whole sticks, and grate them with the beautifully crafted (and highly giftable!) cinnamon grater that Cinnamon Hill has designed. Truly, you don’t know what cinnamon tastes like until you’ve tried freshly harvested, freshly grated, top-grade cinnamon, and it makes an amazing difference in this recipe.

Get your FREE seasonal produce calendar!

If you're excited about greenmarkets, in Paris and beyond, you need my seasonal produce calendar; it's FREE to download! I've drawn up this handy guide to tell you what's in season when, and how long things will stay fresh, so you can cook healthy, colorful meals and not waste a single lettuce leaf, like, ever.

Shakshouka

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Shakshouka Recipe

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes

Serves 3 to 4.

Shakshouka Recipe

Ingredients

  • olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 200 grams (7 ounces) onions, thinly sliced
  • 200 grams (7 ounces) bell peppers (2 small or 1 large; I like green for the color contrast), seeded and thinly sliced
  • 1 small chili pepper (optional; ground chili powder or harissa may be substituted to taste), thinly sliced (keep the seeds if you like it hot, remove them otherwise)
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon cumin (whole seeds or ground)
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 1 teaspoon paprika (sweet or hot, smoked or not)
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon (I use fresh cinnamon from Cinnamon Hill)
  • 1 kilogram ripe tomatoes, cut into big chunks (out of season, you can substitute 800 grams/28 ounces jarred or canned whole tomatoes; if canned, pick a brand with no BPA in the lining)
  • 6 to 8 fresh eggs
  • the leaves from a few stems of fresh parsley or cilantro
  • 16 Greek-style black olives, pitted and roughly chopped
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • good crusty bread, for serving

Instructions

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large skillet. Add the garlic, onions, bell peppers, and chili pepper if using. Stir and cook over medium heat, stirring regularly, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the spices (cumin to cinnamon), stir well, and cook for a minute until fragrant.
  2. Add the tomatoes, stir, and simmer uncovered over medium-high heat, stirring regularly, until all the ingredients have melded together, the excess juices from the tomatoes have evaporated, and you're left with a thickish sauce -- exact timing will depend on how juicy your tomatoes are, but expect around 20 minutes of simmering. Taste and adjust the seasoning. (The recipe can be made in advance until this point. Let cool, transfer to an airtight container, and refrigerate; reheat in the skillet before using. The sauce may also be frozen.)
  3. Make sure the sauce is quite hot before you add in the eggs. Depending on the number of guests, form 6 to 8 shallow wells in the sauce, and break an egg into each. Some of the whites will spill over to the next wells and that's fine. Cook over medium heat without disturbing until the whites are set to your liking. You can cover the pan to speed up the cooking. (Alternatively, if cooking for one, you can heat up a single serving of the sauce in a small skillet, as pictured.)
  4. Sprinkle with parsley, olives, and pepper, and drizzle with a little bit of olive oil. Serve immediately, using a spatula to lift the eggs without breaking the yolks, with bread for mopping up the juices.
http://chocolateandzucchini.com/recipes/vegetables-grains/shakshuka-recipe/
Unless otherwise noted, all recipes are copyright Clotilde Dusoulier.

Shakshouka

This post was first published in August 2013 and updated in July 2017.

The post Shakshuka Recipe appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.



FILMS ON FRIDAY

A Single Man

Directed by - Tom Ford

———————-

When I said last week might be a heavier choice for Films on Friday I was thinking about this film.  A Single Man is beautifully filmed and acted, starring Colin Firth, Julianne Moore, Nicholas Hoult, and Matthew Goode in a story set in the 1960′s. The directorial debut of Tom Ford, A juggernaut in the fashion world, A Single Man delivers pain and beauty in tandem while exploring the depths of human love and loss.  This one is as dark and heartbreaking as it is gorgeous and riveting. Glad to have you on board this week!

Opinions as always are welcomed in the comments on http://www.thewilliambeckettblog.com where we’ll be chatting back and forth during the movie.

Thanks again for joining in tonight especially if its your first time.

START TIME : 9 PM CT.

HOW TO WATCH : STREAMING ON NETFLIX.

SEE YOU LATER TONIGHT!

-WB

Posted by clotilde

Buy Clotilde's latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Raspberry Yogurt Cake

Yogurt Cake is a staple of French home baking: it is very easy to make and I have yet to meet someone who doesn’t like it.

What’s notable about the method is that it calls for two (half-cup) tubs of yogurt, and you then use the empty tubs to measure out the rest of the ingredients. This no-scale recipe is a rare exception to the French usage, in which quantities are measured by weight rather than volume.

Raspberry Yogurt Cake

It is very popular with kids, who love a simple, moist and fluffy cake. But what they particularly enjoy is that they can make it almost entirely on their own, perched on a kitchen stool. There is no complicated step, no scale to fiddle with, and with the intensive sandbox training they have, they are usually experts at the emptying and filling of small-sized containers.

Mini Cookbook of French Tarts

The basic gâteau au yaourt recipe lends itself to a lot of great variations. You can add citrus juice, zest, or peel for a delicious lemon or orange cake, you can add chocolate chips or nuts to the batter, you can slice the baked cake in two and spread a layer of jam in the middle, you can frost the cake with a chocolate frosting… Whatever strikes your fancy.

Raspberry Yogurt Cake

I especially like this variation, in which I fold raspberries (fresh or frozen) into the batter, and substitute almond flour for part of the flour. The berries bring delightful tart notes, and the almond flour make the cake even moister.

We typically have this as an afternoon treat, but it is such a subtly sweet cake, it would be perfect for breakfast or brunch as well.

Raspberry Yogurt Cake

Tag your pics with #cnzrecipes

Want to try this? Please share your pics on Instagram and Twitter -- I can't wait to see them!

Raspberry Yogurt Cake Recipe

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Serves 8.

Raspberry Yogurt Cake Recipe

Ingredients

  • 240 ml (1 cup) plain yogurt (two 120-ml ou 1/2-cup tubs, which is the French standard)
  • (Use one of the empty tubs to measure out the ingredient amounts given in tubs)
  • 1 1/2 tubs (3/4 cup) sugar (I typically use blond unrefined sugar), plus 1 to 2 tablespoons for sprinkling
  • 1/2 tub (1/4 cup) oil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3 tubs (1 1/2 cup) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tub (1/2 cup) almond flour (you can also use almond meal or finely ground almonds)
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 300 grams (10 1/2 ounces) raspberries (fresh or frozen; no need to thaw if frozen)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 175°C (350°F). Line a 22-cm (9-inch) round cake pan with parchment paper.
  2. Raspberry Yogurt Cake
  3. In a large mixing bowl, put the yogurt, the 1 1/2 tub sugar, the oil, and the eggs.
  4. Raspberry Yogurt Cake
  5. Whisk together until combined.
  6. Raspberry Yogurt Cake
  7. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, almond flour, baking powder, and salt.
  8. Add the flour mixture to the wet ingredients and mix it in with a spatula until you can't see white traces of flour. Do not overmix; some lumps are OK.
  9. Raspberry Yogurt Cake
  10. Pour half the batter into the cake pan. Cover evenly with half of the raspberries.
  11. Raspberry Yogurt Cake
  12. Pour the other half of the batter, and add the other half of the raspberries on top. Sprinkle evenly with the remaining sugar.
  13. Raspberry Yogurt Cake
  14. Put into the oven to bake, for 30 to 35 minutes, until the top is springy and a cake tester comes out clean. If it looks like the top of the cake is browning too quickly, cover loosely with foil for the rest of the baking time.
  15. Allow to rest on the counter for 15 minutes. Lift from the pan, and transfer to a rack to cool.
  16. Serve slightly warm or completely cooled.
http://chocolateandzucchini.com/recipes/cakes-tarts/raspberry-yogurt-cake-recipe/
Unless otherwise noted, all recipes are copyright Clotilde Dusoulier.

Raspberry Yogurt Cake

This post was first published in May 2014 and updated in July 2017.

The post Raspberry Yogurt Cake Recipe appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.



FILMS ON FRIDAY

The Little Prince

Directed by - Mark Osborne

———————-

So it turns out I decided to change course a bit tonight.  Although there are certainly ‘heavy’ elements to The Little Prince as well, I thought it’d be great to feature one of my favorite animated films adapted from one of my favorite books.  “The Little Prince” is a beautiful and heartbreaking story adaptation of the story most of us know from childhood donning some of the best and most imaginative animation I’ve ever seen. Let’s just say I have a hard time getting through this one without springing at least a single man tear. Without further ado, “The Little Prince”.

Opinions as always are welcomed in the comments on http://www.thewilliambeckettblog.com where we’ll be chatting back and forth during the movie.

Thanks again for joining in tonight especially if its your first time.

START TIME : 9 PM CT.

HOW TO WATCH : STREAMING ON NETFLIX.

SEE YOU LATER TONIGHT!

-WB

.